Pets

Boy and Dog

Make a Plan for Your Pet

Plan in advance what you will do in an emergency.  Use common sense and whatever you have on hand to take care of yourself and ensure your pet’s safety during an emergency.

Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you, if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your pets may not be allowed inside. Secure appropriate lodging in advance depending on the number and type of animals in your care. Consider family or friends outside your immediate area. Other options may include: a hotel or motel that takes pets or some sort of boarding facility, such as a kennel or veterinary hospital that is near an evacuation facility or your family’s meeting place. Find out before an emergency happens if any of these facilities in your area might be viable options for you and your pets.

Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation plans and show them where you keep your pet’s emergency supply kit. Also designate specific locations, one in your immediate neighborhood and other farther away, where you will meet in an emergency.

Talk to Your Pet’s Veterinarian About Emergency Planning

Discuss the types of things you should include in your pet’s emergency first aid kit. Get the names of vets or veterinary hospitals in other cities where you might need to seek temporary shelter. Also talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. If you and your pet are separated, this permanent implant for your pet and corresponding enrollment in a recovery database can help a veterinarian or shelter identify your animal.

Gather Contact Information for Emergency Animal Treatment

Make a list of contact information and addresses of local animal control agencies including the Humane Society or ASPCA and emergency veterinary hospitals. Keep one copy of these phone numbers with you, and one in your pet’s emergency supply kit. Obtain “Pets Inside” stickers and place them on your doors or windows, including information on the number and types of pets in your home to alert firefighters and rescue workers. Consider putting a phone number on the sticker where you could be reached in an emergency.

 Get a Kit of Pet Emergency Supplies

Just as you do with your family’s emergency supply kit, think first about the basics for survival, particularly food and water. Keep at least three days of food in an airtight, waterproof container. Additionally, store at least three days of water specifically for your pets, in addition to water you need for yourself and your family.

Medicines and Medical Records

Keep an extra supply of medicines your pet takes on a regular basis in a waterproof container.

First Aid kit

Talk to your veterinarian about what is most appropriate for your pet’s emergency medical needs. Most kits should include cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol and saline solution. Include a pet first aid reference book.

Have a Collar with ID Tag and Leash

Your pet should wear a collar with its rabies tag and identification at all times. Include a backup leash, collar and ID tag in your pet’s emergency supply kit.

Gather Important Documents

Place copies of your pet’s registration information, adoption papers, vaccination documents and medical records in a clean plastic bag or waterproof container and also add them to your kit.

Have a Crate or Other Pet Carrier Ready

Make sure you have one ready in the event you need to evacuate in an emergency.

For more information, see this pet brochure, visit ready.gov or call your local county Emergency Management Office.

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